The Empire State Winter Games is a community-driven event, courtesy of a partnership between the Adirondack Sports Council (ADKSC); the towns of North Elba, Wilmington, Tupper Lake, Harrietstown, and Brighton; the villages of Lake Placid, Tupper Lake, Paul Smiths, Wilmington, and Saranac Lake; the counties of Essex and Franklin; Regional Office of Sustainable Tourism (ROOST) and the New York State Olympic Regional Development Authority (ORDA).

Cross Country

In addition to being a popular wintertime leisure activity, cross-country skiing can also be highly competitive. Divided into two techniques, classic and skate, cross-country (Nordic) skiing is known for being one of the most physically demanding, as well as enjoyable, sports. For more information on cross-country skiing.

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Ski Orienteering

Ski orienteering (SkiO) is a cross-country skiing endurance winter racing sport and one of the four orienteering disciplines recognized by the IOF. A successful ski orienteer combines high physical endurance, strength, and excellent technical skiing skills with the ability to navigate and make the best route choices while skiing at a high speed.

Standard orienteering maps are commonly used, but since 2019, a separate mapping standard ISSkiOM has been produced, which recommends a subset of the symbols used in other disciplines. Ski-orienteering maps use green symbols to indicate trails and tracks and different symbols to indicate their navigability in the snow other symbols indicate whether any roads are snow-covered or clear. Navigation tactics is similar to mountain bike orienteering. Standard skate-skiing equipment is used, along with a map holder attached to the chest. Compared to cross-country skiing, upper body strength is more important because of the double-poling needed along narrow snow trails.

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Skeleton

Speed, precision, and finesse are key in the sport of skeleton. As athletes slide head first, just inches from the ice, down the 20 curves, 1,455 meter track, detail is everything. Subtle shifts in body weight, as well as pressure to the shoulders and kneebars, steer the sled at blistering speeds. Skeleton is divided into two divisions: Men’s and Women’s.

Propel yourself down the icy shoot or watch these aerodynamic sliders wiz by, reaching speeds of up to 80 mph. Don’t blink, you may miss them flying by!

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Junior Bobsled

Speed and strength are at the core of bobsled. Every hundredth of a second counts as athletes hurl down the icy track, banking around turns in the search of the perfect line that will get them on to the podium. Three disciplines make up a bobsled competition — men’s and women’s two-man and the four-man.

Tackle the challenging 20 curve, 1,455-meter track that hosted the 1980 Winter Olympic Games. Spectators, try not to blink or you may miss the sleds flying by at upwards of 70 mph.

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Adaptive Bobsled

Para-Bobsled found its start in the early 2000s with its first World Cup event in 2014-2015. As of right now, the World Cup hosts only one category of athletes: a seated category for athletes that have spinal cord injuries, above-the-knee amputations, and other injuries which medically fit that classification. The U.S. team has a large contingent of lower limb amputees due to warrior programs and currently, they do not fit into that classification.
The ESWG event in February is a first of its kind in that we are hosting a “push” event for athletes that currently do not classify into the World Cup seated category.

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Biathlon

An intriguing sport for spectators, biathlon combines the physically demanding sport of cross-country skiing with the precision of marksmanship. While every hundredth of a second counts, so does every shot, meaning athletes must control their breathing the entire race to ensure their hand stays steady. Those who succeed in balancing speed and accuracy will be the ones standing atop the podium at the end of the day.

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Adaptive Biathlon

An intriguing sport for spectators, adaptive biathlon combines the demanding sport of adaptive cross-country skiing with the precision of marksmanship. While every hundredth of a second counts, so does every shot, meaning athletes must control their breathing the entire race to ensure their hand stays steady. Those who succeed in balancing speed and accuracy will be the ones standing atop the podium at the end of the day.

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Luge

Speed and aerodynamics define the sport of luge. Sliding feet first down an icy track, athletes look to shave off every thousandth of a second they can. Keeping their bodies as relaxed as possible as they shoot down the 20 curve, 1,455 meter track, lugers engage their core and steer the sled with simple leg pressure on the runners or shoulder pressure on the sled.

Slide your way to glory. USA Luge hosts multiple slider search programs throughout the year to look for future Team USA athletes.

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Ski Jumping / Nordic Combined

Soar through the air on your way to glory. Ski jumping always attracts a crowd and leaves them speechless, mesmerized, and with a smile on their face. Jumpers speed down the ramp, catapulting themselves up and out, before softly landing on the hill below them. Aerodynamics play a huge role in the sport of ski jumping, which is why jumps are scored not only on distance but on technique as well.

Do you want to experience a bird’s eye view? The US Ski & Snowboard Association (USSA) provides clubs for aspiring athletes to help them spread their skis and fly.

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